The Enterprise - National Study Builds On Silent Spring’s Work On Household Chemicals

November 21, 2008

Excerpt: Although Americans are becoming increasingly aware of toxic chemical exposure from everyday household products like bisphenol A in some baby bottles and lead in some toys, women do not readily connect typical household products with personal chemical exposure and related adverse health effects, according to research from the December issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

“People more readily equate pollution with large-scale contamination and environmental disasters, yet the products and activities that form the backdrop to our everyday lives—electronics, cleaners, beauty products, food packaging—are a significant source of daily personal chemical exposure that accumulates over time,” said sociologist Rebecca Gasior Altman, the lead author of the study, “Pollution Comes Home and Gets Personal: Women’s Experience of Household Chemical Exposure.”

(no longer available online)

Reporting Individual Exposure Results