Environmental Protection - Silent Spring Study: Residential Indoor Air Has High Levels of EDCs

August 5, 2010

Excerpt: Homes in low-income and affluent communities in California both had similarly high levels of endocrine disruptors, and the levels were higher in indoor air than outdoor air, according to a new study believed to be the first that paired indoor and outdoor air samples for such wide range (104) of these substances.

The study, “Semivolatile Endocrine-Disrupting Compounds in Paired Indoor and Outdoor Air in Two Northern California Communities,” appears in Environmental Science & Technology, a semi-monthly journal.

Ruthann Rudel, Ph.D., of the Silent Spring Institute, and colleagues note concern about the reproductive and other health effects of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), which are found in many products used in the home. Examples include phthalates, which are found in vinyl and other plastics, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which are found in older paints, electrical equipment, and building materials. EDCs also are among the ingredients in some pesticides, fragrances, and other materials.

Household Exposure Study: Richmond and Bolinas, California