We all carry a body burden of environmental chemicals. But when does that burden grow too heavy? Which chemicals can be tolerated, and which trigger or hasten the development of cancerous cells?

Publications and Presentations

Cardona, B. and R.A. Rudel. 2021. Application of an in vitro assay to identify chemicals that increase estradiol and progesterone synthesis and are potential breast cancer risk factorsEnvironmental Health Perspectives. doi.org/10.1289/EHP8608

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Cardona, B. and R.A. Rudel. 2020. US EPA's regulatory pesticide evaluations need clearer guidelines for considering mammary gland tumors and other mammary gland effectsMolecular and Cellular Endocrinology.  doi.org/10.1016/j.mce.2020.110927

Article

Rudel, R.A., J.M. Ackerman, K.R. Attfield, J.G. Brody. 2014. New Exposure Biomarkers as Tools for Breast Cancer Epidemiology, Biomonitoring, and Prevention: A Systematic Approach Based on Animal Evidence. Environmental Health Perspectives, 122(9):881-895. doi:10.1289/ehp.1307455

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Brody, J.G., R.A. Rudel. 2008. Environmental Pollutants and Breast Cancer: The Evidence from Animal and Human Studies. Breast Diseases: A Year Book Quarterly, 19(1):17-19.

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Rudel, R.A., K. R. Attfield, J. Schifano, J.G. Brody. 2007. Chemicals causing mammary gland tumors in animals signal new directions for epidemiology, chemicals testing, and risk assessment for breast cancer prevention. Cancer, 109 (S12): 2635-2666. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.22653

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